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3. Description of the pull-down menus

This chapter describes the pull-down menus and all their sub-menus. The main menu bar, the topmost line of the screen, is selected with the hotkey F10 or by clicking with the mouse at this line. You can walk through the menu with the cursor keys and a menu entry is selected with ENTER or by clicking with the mouse on it.

3.1 System menu  
3.2 File  
3.3 Edit  
3.4 Search  
3.5 Run  
3.6 Compile menu  
3.7 Debug  
3.8 Project  
3.9 Options  
3.10 Windows  
3.11 Help  


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3.1 System menu

This menu has its name only that one can speak about it. The symbol for this menu is the leftmost symbol in the menu bar. Alt+SPACE selects this menu.

3.1.1 About  
3.1.2 Bug report  
3.1.3 FSDB  
3.1.4 GREP  
3.1.5 GDB  
3.1.6 Refresh Desktop  
3.1.7 Calculator  
3.1.8 Puzzle  
3.1.9 Calender  
3.1.10 ASCII table  


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3.1.1 About

This brings up a window with information about the author and the version of RHIDE.


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3.1.2 Bug report

This menu entry opens an editor with some important information which should be part of a bug report and where you can describe the problem.


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3.1.3 FSDB

With this menu item you can call the FSDB debugger, which comes with DJGPP. But remember, this runs the debugger as an external program and it is not integrated in RHIDE.


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3.1.4 GREP

This is a very useful function. You can type the arguments for grep in the input line, which will be shown, and after this the program grep is called. The messages from grep are redirected to the message window see section 4.8 Message window.


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3.1.5 GDB

This is analog to the call of FSDB see section 3.1.3 FSDB.


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3.1.6 Refresh Desktop

This function is sometimes useful, if you had run your program and it wrote some things to the screen (for redirecting stdout and stderr from your program to a window in RHIDE see section 3.9.6.3 Preferences.)


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3.1.7 Calculator

This brings up a dialog, where you can do some calculations. This dialog is similar to the evaluate dialog see section 3.7.2 Evaluate/Modify, but it uses not the feature of GDB, but it is a separate calculator. For more information see section `Calculator' in SETs Editor.

There can be used also some of the standard functions like `log', `sin' and so on and it can convert also integer values between different bases (`hex', `oct', `dec').


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3.1.8 Puzzle

This will open a small window, where you can play a little puzzle game. The "stones" are moved with the cursor keys or by clicking with the mouse on it.


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3.1.9 Calender

This will open a little calender. With the cursor keys Up and Down you can switch to the next/previous month or click with the mouse on the small symbols in the upper corners.


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3.1.10 ASCII table

This will open a window with all the ASCII characters. Move around with the cursor keys or press any key to select any wanted character. In the bottom line you will see the the character and the value of it (decimal and hexadecimal). The decimal value can be used to create that character for instance in the editor by holding the Alt key down and typing the value on the numeric key pad.


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3.2 File

In this menu you can find functions, which deal with files, like open, close, save and so on.

3.2.1 Open  
3.2.2 New  
3.2.3 Save  
3.2.4 Save as  
3.2.5 Save all  
3.2.6 DOS Shell  
3.2.7 Exit  


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3.2.1 Open

Brings up the file-open dialog, where you can select a file to open (hotkey F3 ). This dialog contains an input line for the filename, a list of filenames, an information window and the buttons for opening and canceling.

In the filename input line you can type directly the file, which you want to open or you can type any mask to list only some files. The default mask is `*.cc', but you can change this to anything and your last typed mask is stored as the default mask for the next use. There is also a history of your previous typed inputs available. This is selected when you hit the down key or click at the small symbol at the end of the input line with your mouse.

The list of filenames shows all the files that correspond to the mask. If this list is selected you can choose a file with the cursor keys, or you can type the first letters of the filename you want, and the bar is located at the first file, which has these letters as the first characters. To open the file simply press ENTER or double click with the mouse on it.

Below the list of filenames there is a small window with information about the selected file (complete path, size, modification time).

To leave the dialog without opening a file press ESC .


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3.2.2 New

This is the menu entry for creating a new file to edit. This file gets the title 'Untitled'. If you save or close it, you will be prompted for a new name of this file by opening the file-open dialog.


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3.2.3 Save

Save the file in the current editor-window to disk. If the name of the current file is 'Untitled' you will be prompted for a new name. F2 is the hotkey for this function. The modification of the file on disk is set to the time of the last modification of this file and not to the time when saving to disk.

If the file was not modified, it is not saved!!


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3.2.4 Save as

Save the file in the current editor-window to disk under a different name, for which you will be prompted. For choosing the new name the file-open dialog will be opened.


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3.2.5 Save all

Save all the editor files to disk. If they are not modified, they will not be saved.


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3.2.6 DOS Shell

This executes a DOS-Shell. This is done by calling the program, which is set in the environment variable COMSPEC. If this variable does not exist, the program `c:/command.com' is executed. To return to the IDE type exit at the DOS-prompt. Before calling DOS, the program does a Save all see section 3.2.5 Save all automatically.


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3.2.7 Exit

Here you can quit the IDE. If there are any unsaved editor-files, you will be prompted for saving them. (Alt+X is the hotkey.)


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3.3 Edit

In this menu you can activate functions, which are related to the integrated editor. Most of them have a hotkey.

3.3.1 Undo  
3.3.2 Redo  
3.3.3 Cut  
3.3.4 Copy  
3.3.5 Paste  
3.3.6 Show Clipboard  
3.3.7 Clear  
3.3.8 Copy to Windows clipboard  
3.3.9 Paste from Windows clipboard  
3.3.10 Expand all tabs  
3.3.11 Compact text  
3.3.12 Macro  


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3.3.1 Undo

This undoes your last change in the current editor-window. Alt+Backspace is the hotkey for this function.


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3.3.2 Redo

This does the reverse to undo see section 3.3.1 Undo. That means, it is the undo of the undo.


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3.3.3 Cut

This moves the selected text in the current editor-window to the clipboard. (Shift+Del is the hotkey.)


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3.3.4 Copy

This copys the selected text in the current editor-window to the clipboard. (Ctrl+Ins is the hotkey.)


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3.3.5 Paste

This inserts the selected text in the clipboard in the current editor-window at the current cursor-position. (Shift+Ins is the hotkey.)


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3.3.6 Show Clipboard

This brings up an editor-window with the contents of the clipboard. The contents of the clipboard will be lost, if you exit the IDE.


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3.3.7 Clear

This erases the selected text in the current editor-window.


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3.3.8 Copy to Windows clipboard

This is the same function as See section 3.3.4 Copy, but it uses the Windows clipboard and works only, when running under Windows.


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3.3.9 Paste from Windows clipboard

This is the same function as See section 3.3.5 Paste, but it uses the Windows clipboard and works only, when running under Windows.


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3.3.10 Expand all tabs

When selecting this menu entry, all real tabs (all characters with the code 0x9) are expanded to as many spaces as defined as the tabsize see section 3.9.6.3 Preferences.


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3.3.11 Compact text

This function is the reverse to See section 3.3.10 Expand all tabs. That means, RHIDE tries to make as many as possible spaces (count is taken from the defined tabsize) to real tabs.


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3.3.12 Macro

Here is a submenu for handling macros. Currently there is only one recordable macro available and it is NOT stored anywhere. That means it is lost when you leave RHIDE and restart it. There is another way of using macros see section 4.13 Defining macros.

3.3.12.1 Record  
3.3.12.2 Stop  
3.3.12.3 Play  


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3.3.12.1 Record

After selecting this function, all your keystrokes are recorded to reproduce them later.

(Shift+F10 is the hotkey.)


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3.3.12.2 Stop

This stops the recording of a macro.

(Alt+F10 is the hotkey.)


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3.3.12.3 Play

This executes the recorded macro.

(Ctrl+F10 is the hotkey.)


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3.4 Search

Menu for searching and replacing strings in the editor-window. These functions have also hotkeys.

3.4.1 Find  
3.4.2 Replace  
3.4.3 Search again  
3.4.4 Goto line  
3.4.5 Jump to function  
3.4.6 Next message  
3.4.7 Previous message  


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3.4.1 Find

Find a string in the current editor-window. You can type the string for searching in an input line and you can also select, if the search is case sensitive or not and to search for whole words only or not.

(Ctrl+Q+F is the hotkey.)


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3.4.2 Replace

Find and replace a string in the current editor-window. This works in the same way like searching text, but additionally you can give a string, with which the found text will be replaced.

(Ctrl+Q+A is the hotkey.)


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3.4.3 Search again

This function repeats the last search or replace operation.

(Ctrl+L is the hotkey,)


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3.4.4 Goto line

After prompting for a line number (with range checking), the cursor will be located at this line.

(Ctrl+J is the hotkey.)


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3.4.5 Jump to function

With this feature you can easily jump to the source line of a function to edit or see it. This is only a heuristic by parsing your source file and does not take the information from the debugging symbols.

After selecting it you will get a dialog, from where you can select the function to which you want to jump.

(Alt+F2 is the hotkey.)


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3.4.6 Next message

This selects the next message in the message window see section 4.8 Message window, but only, if there is a next message available.

(Alt+F8 is the hotkey.)


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3.4.7 Previous message

This selects the previous message in the message window see section 4.8 Message window, but only, if there is a previous message available.

(Alt+F7 is the hotkey.)


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3.5 Run

In this menu you find the functions for running your program.

3.5.1 Run  
3.5.2 Step over  
3.5.3 Trace into  
3.5.4 Go to cursor  
3.5.5 Program reset  
3.5.6 Arguments  


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3.5.1 Run

If your project-target is an executable, this will be run after doing a See section 3.6.2 Make. Ctrl+F9 is the hotkey. If the build was not successful, the program will not be started. The debugging functions are only available if `-g' was used for compiling see section 2.2 Syntax of arguments.


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3.5.2 Step over

This executes the code for exactly one source line. If there is a function call at the current line this function is executed at once without stepping through this function.

When using the Shift-key, RHIDE will NOT switch to the user screen when executing the debuggee.

(hotkey F8 or hotkey Shift+F8 may be used.)


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3.5.3 Trace into

This is the same as See section 3.5.2 Step over, except when there is a function call at the current line and for this function debugging information is available, RHIDE steps into this function.

When using the Shift-key, RHIDE will NOT switch to the user screen when executing the debuggee.

(hotkey F7 or hotkey Shift+F7 may be used.)


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3.5.4 Go to cursor

This will execute your program until the execution comes to the line, where the cursor is. If the program is stopped at any other place by a breakpoint the program will stop there and not at the cursor position.

When using the Shift-key, RHIDE will NOT switch to the user screen when executing the debuggee.

(hotkey F4 or hotkey Shift+F4 may be used.)


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3.5.5 Program reset

This 'kills' your debuggee at the current execution point without executing any other code of your program

(Ctrl+F2 is the hotkey.)

3.5.5.1 Main function  


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3.5.5.1 Main function

Here you can define the name of the main function of your program. This is needed at least when debugging programs, (like written with GNU Pascal or GNU Fortran), where the function of your main program is not main.

But you can use this also to debug your program at locations, which are executed normally before main is called (for instance the global constructors).


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3.5.6 Arguments

Here you can type the arguments, which will be passed to your program when you do a run see section 3.5.1 Run and see section 2.2 Syntax of arguments.


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3.6 Compile menu

Here are the functions to translate your source files and for updating your project.

3.6.1 Compile  
3.6.2 Make  
3.6.3 Link  
3.6.4 Build all  


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3.6.1 Compile

Compile the file in the current editor-window or the selected entry in the project-window if you are there. The IDE chooses automatically the correct compiler, depending on the suffix of the file see section 2.1 Known suffixes.

(Alt+F9 is the hotkey.)


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3.6.2 Make

This makes your project up to date. It works like MAKE on commandline with a makefile. F9 is the hotkey. The dependencies are checked for each item of the project. These dependencies are automatically generated, if you compile a file within the IDE.


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3.6.3 Link

This function has two different results depending on the type of your project. If your project is an executable see section 2.1 Known suffixes, the linker is started. But if it is a library, all the object files are taken to build a library.


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3.6.4 Build all

This builds the project completely new with compiling and linking all of the project-items.


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3.7 Debug

This menu contains the functions for debugging your program. Most of them have hotkeys and they are described in more detail later see section 5. Debugging with RHIDE.

3.7.1 Set/Reset Breakpoint  
3.7.2 Evaluate/Modify  
3.7.3 Watch an expression  
3.7.4 Breakpoints  
3.7.5 Disassembler window  
3.7.6 Call stack  
3.7.7 List of Functions  


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3.7.1 Set/Reset Breakpoint

See section 5.5.1 Setting a breakpoint.

(Ctrl+F8 is the hotkey.)


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3.7.2 Evaluate/Modify

See section 5.3.2 Evaluating the contents of variables.

(Ctrl+F4 is the hotkey.)


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3.7.3 Watch an expression

See section 5.3.3 Watching the contents of variables.

(Ctrl+F7 is the hotkey.)


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3.7.4 Breakpoints

See section 5.5.2 Modifying and setting a breakpoint.


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3.7.5 Disassembler window

This opens a window, where you can see assembler instructions. When you are running the debugger, you will see the instructions at the current execution point of your program.

You can step see section 3.5.2 Step over or trace see section 3.5.3 Trace into here in the same way like in an editor window and you can also debug code, which has no debugging information.

Additionally you can scroll here also forwards or backwards but scrolling backwards is very hard to implememnt and so you will get when scrolling backwards most of the time wrong output. Sorry for this, but until I find more time to implement this better you have to live with it.


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3.7.6 Call stack

This shows a window with a list of functions, from which the current execution point in the debugged program is called. If you hit Enter on a function which has line number debugging information, you will go to the source line which is shown in the window.

(Ctrl+F3 is the hotkey.)


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3.7.7 List of Functions

This asks first for a regular expression to list only those functions of your program, which match that expression. The syntax for such a regular expression is a little bit different from the wildcards you are probably knowing from MS-DOS.

If you want to get a list of all functions you should enter either nothing (the default), or ".*", or "?*" (both without the double quotes). The expression "*" does NOT mean all function. In fact, your entry will be interpreted as a regular expression.

After you have typed the expression and pressed Enter, you will get a list of functions that match the regular expression and for which debugging information is available.

This list is sorted by the name of the function and has three parts:

 
NAME | RETURN VALUE | FILE

You can walk through the list with the cursor keys or the mouse. If you hit Enter or double click a function, you will go the the source code of that function.


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3.8 Project

Here you can add or remove items to or from your project

3.8.1 Open project  
3.8.2 Close project  
3.8.3 Add item  
3.8.4 Delete item  
3.8.5 Local options  
3.8.6 Includes  
3.8.7 Main targetname  
3.8.8 Primary file  
3.8.9 Clear dependencies  
3.8.10 Delete rebuildable files  
3.8.11 Write Makefile  


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3.8.1 Open project

Here is the point to open a project. After selecting this menu item, the file open dialog is opened to select a project. You can type the name of the project or select one from the list.

If you open a project in another directory than the current, RHIDE will change the current directory to this directory and then the project will be opened.

If you type here a name of a project which does not exist, a new one is created.

If no project was opened and you create a new project, all open desktop files remain open, but they are not added to the project. If a project was opened, it will be automatically closed before the new project is opened.


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3.8.2 Close project

This closes the currently opened project and closes all files, which are on the desktop.


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3.8.3 Add item

A dialog will be opened, from where you can choose your file to add to your project. If you are in the project window see section 4.4 Project window you can use the Ins key to activate this function within the project window.

Currently it is impossible to use relative or absolute paths as part of a project item. If you have your files in several directories, you have to setup either the search path for source files or you have to create for each directory a library that can be included in your project.


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3.8.4 Delete item

This will remove the selected item in the project-window from your project. If you are in the project window see section 4.4 Project window you can use the Del key to activate this function.


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3.8.5 Local options

Here you can give the selected project-item options for compiling, which will be in effect only for this item. If you are in the project window see section 4.4 Project window you can use Ctrl+O to activate this function. The options you give here are passed to GCC only, when compiling this file. For more details see see section 4.4.4 Local options for a project item.


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3.8.6 Includes

This shows the dependencies for the selected item in the project window. You can use the hotkey Ctrl+I in the project window. see section 4.4 Project window


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3.8.7 Main targetname

Here you can change the name of your main target. The main target is either an executable file or a library. RHIDE selects the type of the main target from the suffix of this name. If it has no suffix or the suffix `.exe', an executable will be built. If it has the suffix `.a', a library will be created.

Remember when you give it no suffix, both, the COFF image and the `.exe' file will created. If it has the `.exe' suffix, only the `.exe' file is created.


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3.8.8 Primary file

Here you can give the primary source file, when you want to use the 'automake' feature of GPC. If you type a source name here, RHIDE assumes that your program is written in Pascal and does NOT check any dependencies of the project, because this is done automatically by GPC with the `--automake' option.

If you don't want to use the 'automake' feature of GPC, even when building a Pascal program, give here an empty name, which is the default.


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3.8.9 Clear dependencies

This function removes all internal stored dependencies. The files are not removed. This is useful when you want to create a makefile see section 3.8.11 Write Makefile and you do not want to include all the absolute filenames for the dependencies (mostly the include files).

This function is a relict from earlier versions of RHIDE, but I have not disabled it.


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3.8.10 Delete rebuildable files

This function includes the function of clearing the dependencies see section 3.8.9 Clear dependencies and removes in addition to it all the files, which can be rebuild within RHIDE.


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3.8.11 Write Makefile

Here you can create a makefile that contains all the rules to build the project from the command line without starting RHIDE. For this you need the GNU make, because the generated makefile uses the features of GNU make very extensively.

If you have used environment variables in your search paths see section 3.9.1 Directories, these are not expanded in the generated makefile. But all variables you used will be defined at the beginning of the makefile with their current value.


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3.9 Options

This menu contains many submenus for anything you can customize.

3.9.1 Directories  
3.9.2 C/C++-Compiler  
3.9.3 Libraries  
3.9.4 Linker options  
3.9.5 Compiler options  
3.9.6 Environment  
3.9.7 Save options  
3.9.8 Load options  


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3.9.1 Directories

Here you can define all of the paths, where RHIDE and the compilers finds the needed files and where to store some files.

All the paths you can define in the several entries have the form of a semicolon separated list of directories, just like your environment variable %PATH%. You can use forward slashes and back slashes, but they are all converted to forward slashes by RHIDE. You can also use environment variables as part of your paths. The syntax of such a variable is that of a GNU makefile. If you want to use the variable `%DJDIR%', you must type `$(DJDIR)'.

3.9.1.1 Include directories  
3.9.1.2 Library directories  
3.9.1.3 Object directories  
3.9.1.4 Sources directories  
3.9.1.5 Standard headers  


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3.9.1.1 Include directories

Place here a list of directories, where gcc (and RHIDE) should search for header files which you use via #include ... and which are not in the default directories (like %DJDIR%/include) If you want to use for instance allegro, put here the directory, where allegro.h is.

This is the list of directories, where GCC looks for include files and RHIDE searches in this directory (after looking in the current directory) for header files.


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3.9.1.2 Library directories

This is the list of directories, where GCC looks for libraries when linking. RHIDE searches in this directories (after looking in the current directory) for libraries, if you have included them directly as a project item.


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3.9.1.3 Object directories

This is the list of directories where RHIDE looks for object files. If you type here only one directory this has also the effect that the object files, which are compiled, are stored in this directory.


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3.9.1.4 Sources directories

This is the list of directories, where RHIDE looks for the source files (after looking in the current directory).

It enables you also one feature (like I use it mostly at any time), to have the sources in one directory tree and the objects and executables in a total different directory. Simply Go to any directory, create there your project and then add the needed files to your project. Finally specify the path to your sources here and RHIDE will find them.


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3.9.1.5 Standard headers

Define here a space separated list of directories where your standard headers are. Header files found in these directories are not added to the list of dependencies which is automatically generated when compiling a C/C++ source file.


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3.9.2 C/C++-Compiler

In this submenu you can change most flags, which have to do when compiling C or C++ files or better for the options of all the currently supported compilers.

3.9.2.1 Warnings  
3.9.2.2 Optimizations  
3.9.2.3 Debugging  
3.9.2.4 C options  
3.9.2.5 CXX options  
3.9.2.6 Pascal options  
3.9.2.7 Fortran options  
3.9.2.8 How to toggle these flags  


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3.9.2.1 Warnings

This opens a dialog where you can enable or disable most of the flags for generating or suppressing warnings when you compile a C or C++ file. see section 3.9.2.8 How to toggle these flags

For a detailed description of the available flags see section `Warning Options' in gcc.


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3.9.2.2 Optimizations

This opens a dialog where you can customize how the compiler optimizes your code. see section 3.9.2.8 How to toggle these flags

For a detailed description of the available flags see section `Optimize Options' in gcc.


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3.9.2.3 Debugging

This opens a dialog where you can customize the amount of debugging information the compiler should include in object files. see section 3.9.2.8 How to toggle these flags

For a detailed description of the available flags see section `Debugging Options' in gcc.


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3.9.2.4 C options

This opens a dialog where you can select flags that are only passed to GCC when compiling C files. see section 3.9.2.8 How to toggle these flags

For a detailed description of the available flags see section `C Dialect Options' in gcc.


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3.9.2.5 CXX options

This opens a dialog where you can select flags which are only passed to GCC when compiling C++ files. see section 3.9.2.8 How to toggle these flags

For a detailed description of the available flags see section `C++ Dialect Options' in gcc.


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3.9.2.6 Pascal options

This opens a dialog where you can select flags which are only passed to GPC when compiling Pascal files. see section 3.9.2.8 How to toggle these flags

For a detailed description of the available flags see section `Pascal Dialect Options' in gpc.


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3.9.2.7 Fortran options

This opens a dialog where you can select flags which are only passed to g77 when compiling Fortran files. see section 3.9.2.8 How to toggle these flags

For a detailed description of the available flags see section `Fortran Dialect Options' in g77.


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3.9.2.8 How to toggle these flags

The options in the dialogs for Warnings, Debugging, C-flags and CXX-Flags are selected with the cursor-keys or the mouse and are activated or deactivated by pressing SPACE or by double-clicking with the mouse at the first field of the option. If an option can take an additional value or string, an inputbox will be opened, and you can type them there. If the additional value is optional, you can leave this input-box by pressing ESC or activating the Cancel button and no value, or the previous one will be appended to this option.


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3.9.3 Libraries

Here you can tell the linker which libraries will be linked in your program. At this time the number of additional libraries is limited to 16. If you need more, you have to type them manually see section 3.9.4 Linker options

In the input-fields of the dialog you only have to type the part of your library name after `lib' and before `.a'. Example: If your library is `libtv.a' put only `tv' there. You can switch between the input lines for the libraries using Tab or Down Arrow (next field) or Shift+Tab or Up Arrow (previous field). If you have typed your libraries you can activate or disable them by switching the checkbox before the name on or off. This is done by pressing Alt and the corresponding digit or letter of the checkbox at the same time or by clicking with the mouse.

Normally RHIDE checks the types of your source-files and automatically adds some standard libraries, corresponding to these source-files. These are for C++ files the library `libiostream.a' and for Objective C files the `libobjc.a' library. If you want to disable this, deactivate the Use standard libraries checkbox. This adds also the commandline option -nostdlib to GCC, that means, you must give the linker explicitly all of the standard libraries, which you need. This includes the `libgcc.a' and `libc.a' libraries.


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3.9.4 Linker options

Here you can enter a space separated list of options that will be passed to GCC when linking your program. see section 2.2 Syntax of arguments

See section 2.2 Syntax of arguments.


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3.9.5 Compiler options

Here you can enter a space separated list of additional options that will be passed to GCC every time it is called. see section 2.2 Syntax of arguments

See section 2.2 Syntax of arguments.


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3.9.6 Environment

3.9.6.1 Colors  
3.9.6.2 Editor options  
3.9.6.3 Preferences  
3.9.6.4 Mouse options  
3.9.6.5 Reserved words  
3.9.6.6 Pascal reserved words  
3.9.6.7 C-Flags  
3.9.6.8 CXX-Flags  
3.9.6.9 Pascal-Flags  
3.9.6.10 Fortran-Flags  
3.9.6.11 Warning-Flags  
3.9.6.12 Debugging-Flags  
3.9.6.13 Optimization-Flags  
3.9.6.14 User words  


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3.9.6.1 Colors

Here you can customize all of the colors of the IDE.


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3.9.6.2 Editor options

autoindent  
Use tabs  
Persistent blocks  
Intelligent C indenting  
Column cursor  
Row cursor  
Match pair highlight  
Do not move the cursor on paste  
Transparent Blocks  
Optimal fill  
Tabsize  

autoindent

When this is enabled, the editor automatically indents the next line by referring to the previous line if you press enter.

For more information see section `Autoindent' in SETs Editor

See section 3.9.6.2 Editor options.

Use tabs

When this is enabled, the character `\t' is inserted into the text if you press the Tab-key. Otherwise the number of spaces (defined by tabsize) is inserted.

For more information see section `Real Tabs' in SETs Editor.

See section 3.9.6.2 Editor options.

Persistent blocks

Normally, RHIDE uses persistent blocks. This means the selected area will not get unselected if you press a key. If you like the behavior of earlier versions of RHIDE, disable this option.

For more information see section `Persistent Blocks' in SETs Editor.

See section 3.9.6.2 Editor options.

Intelligent C indenting

This option enables the so called 'C intelligent indenting', which is an heuristic for indenting after special key words like if or while more than the normal autoindenting. This works only if autoindent is enabled.

For more information see section `Intelligent C indent' in SETs Editor.

See section 3.9.6.2 Editor options.

Column cursor

This is a special feature of the builtin editor. If you enable this option you will see a vertical special color highlighted column across the whole editor window at the cursor column.

For more information see section `Column cursor' in SETs Editor.

See section 3.9.6.2 Editor options.

Row cursor

This is a special feature of the builtin editor. If you enable this option you will see a horizontal special color highlighted row across the whole editor window at the cursor row.

For more information see section `Row cursor' in SETs Editor.

See section 3.9.6.2 Editor options.

Match pair highlight

If this option is enabled, you will see at any time you type a bracket, brace or parenthesis the matching highlighted or a message, that there was no matching found.

For more information see section `Match pair highlight' in SETs editor.

See section 3.9.6.2 Editor options.

Do not move the cursor on paste

Enable this option, when you want to leave the cursor at it's current position when you paste some text.

See section 3.9.6.2 Editor options.

Transparent Blocks

When this option is enabled, the syntax highlight is still shown in selected blocks.

See section 3.9.6.2 Editor options.

Optimal fill

When enabling this option the editor fills the gaps in your text with an optimal value of spaces and tabs.

See section 3.9.6.2 Editor options.

Tabsize

Additionally you can select here the tabbing size for the editor. This value is used as the global setting for all editor windows which will be opened after setting this value. The currently opened windows will use also this setting.

See section 3.9.6.2 Editor options.


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3.9.6.3 Preferences

Here you can customize some basic options for the work of the IDE. A dialog will be opened where you can turn on or off the following options:

all dependencies in makefile  
create backup files  
syntax highlighting  
Use dual display  
redirect stderr  
redirect stdout  
show process information  
show free memory  
No file caching  
16 background colors  
Show GDB commands  
Use no shadows  
Save text palette  
Save project only when closing  
Show user screen after exit  
Only #include "..." in dependencies  
Directories in project items  
Show disassembler window when needed  
Use RCS  
Screen mode  
Closed windows  

all dependencies in makefile

When this is enabled, all internally stored dependencies for a project item are written to the makefile see section 3.8.11 Write Makefile. You should disable this option, if you want to give another user the makefile of your project, and (s)he has a different directory structure.

See section 3.9.6.3 Preferences.

create backup files

Create backup files when saving. When it is enabled, RHIDE creates a backup of the file to save under the same name as the editing file, but the suffix is replaced with `.bak'

See section 3.9.6.3 Preferences.

syntax highlighting

Turn the Syntax highlight on or off. RHIDE automatically checks the suffix of the editing file to determine the correct syntax highlighting. Currently this is supported only for C, C++, and Pascal source files. All other files are not specially highlighted.

See section 3.9.6.3 Preferences.

Use dual display

Here is an very powerful option. If you have installed on your computer a secondary display (monochrome monitor) in addition to your VGA monitor, RHIDE can (when this option is enabled) switch to the second monitor for it's output and you can see your program on the normal monitor.

If this option is enabled and you have not a secondary monitor installed, RHIDE will detect this and does not switch to it.

See section 3.9.6.3 Preferences.

redirect stderr

Turn this on, if you want to redirect the output to stderr of your program to a window in the IDE. This is also needed, if you want to use the builtin analyzing of a call frame traceback, when your program crashes.

See section 3.9.6.3 Preferences.

redirect stdout

Turn this option on, if you want to redirect the output to stdout from your program to a window in the IDE.

See section 3.9.6.3 Preferences.

show process information

Turn this option on if you want to see which files are checked, when you do a make see section 3.6.2 Make, and to see the commandlines how the compilers are started by RHIDE.

See section 3.9.6.3 Preferences.

show free memory

Turn this option on to show in the upper right corner of the screen a readout of the free memory of your system. This shows both, the virtual and the physical free memory.

See section 3.9.6.3 Preferences.

No file caching

If this option is enabled, RHIDE does not use the internal caching of information about searching files and modification times. Use this only if you have problems with the automatic checking of dependencies, because this slows down RHIDE.

See section 3.9.6.3 Preferences.

16 background colors

On EGA/VGA video cards it is possible to use 16 background colors instead of normal 8. This is done by telling the video card how to interpret the highest bit of the color attribute. If you enable this, you can use up to 16 background colors, otherwise there are only 8 colors for the background available. To get blinking foreground colors, you must use a little trick. Enable at first this option here. Then change the color attribute to highlight background color you want and then reset the '16 background colors' option.

See section 3.9.6.3 Preferences.

Show GDB commands

When this option is enabled you can see in the GDB output window which commands are sent to the builtin GDB from RHIDE.

See section 3.9.6.3 Preferences.

Use no shadows

When this option is enabled RHIDE uses no shadows at all for the windows and dialogs and so on.

See section 3.9.6.3 Preferences.

Save text palette

When you debug a program, which modifies the palette when in text mode, you should enable this option.

Save project only when closing

Enable this option only, when you get a system crash after starting your program and because of the use of disk cache the project, which RHIDE automatically saves before your program is run, is corrupted.

Show user screen after exit

When this option is enabled, RHIDE waits for a keypress after exiting your program. It is in general the same like pressing Alt+F5 after exiting the user program.

Only #include "..." in dependencies

Here you can tell RHIDE to add only header files to the list of dependencies for a project item which are included via

 
#include "..."

Directories in project items

When this option is enabled, RHIDE will allow you to include project items which are not in the current directory or any of the directories specified in the path for source files see section 3.9.1.4 Sources directories. If the item is relative to any of these default searched directories only the relative subdirectory will be part of the item.

An other side effect is, that the resutling object file will be placed also in the same directory relative to the default output directory.

Show disassembler window when needed

When you select this option RHIDE will open always the disassembler window when the execution stops at a location for which there is no line number debugging information available. Default the window can be opened only by explicit request.

This allows you also to debug functions or code from other libraries or the startup code.

Use RCS

Only when this option is enabled, RHIDE will use the builtin knowledge about RCS see section 4.15 RCS and RHIDE.

Screen mode

Here you can select the video mode. If you want to use a video mode other than the ones shown, you have to select the User Mode mode and type the value of this mode (see in the reference of your video card) as a decimal or hexadecimal (preceeded by 0x) number. But you can use only textmodes (modes with starting video ram address at 0xB800:0000. For the numbers of the videomodes refer to the documentation of your video card. If you type an invalid videomode (RHIDE checks it), the 80x25-Mode will automatically selected.

I have tested all available text modes with my et4000-card, and they work. For some modes, (mostly every high resolution text mode) the mouse cursor is shown by my own routine. That means that you can use the mouse also in the high resolution text modes.

See section 3.9.6.3 Preferences.

Closed windows

Define here the number of closed windows which RHIDE should remember. If you want to disable this, give here a number 0 and when RHIDE should remember any closed window give here -1.


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3.9.6.4 Mouse options

Here you can customize a little bit the speed of the double click interval and you can also tell RHIDE to reverse the mouse buttons.


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3.9.6.5 Reserved words

This opens a dialog, where you can modify the list of reserved words the editor knows. If you choose the Default button in this dialog, the default reserved words are generated and any previous words are lost.


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3.9.6.6 Pascal reserved words

This opens a dialog, where you can modify the list of reserved words for Pascal the editor knows. If you choose the Default button in this dialog, the default reserved words are generated and any previous words are lost.


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3.9.6.7 C-Flags

Here you can modify the list of C options, which you can turn on or off see section 3.9.2.4 C options.

See section How to change the list of flags.


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3.9.6.8 CXX-Flags

Here you can modify the list of CXX options, which you can turn on or off see section 3.9.2.5 CXX options.

See section How to change the list of flags.


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3.9.6.9 Pascal-Flags

Here you can modify the list of Pascal options, which you can turn on or off see section 3.9.2.6 Pascal options.

See section How to change the list of flags.


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3.9.6.10 Fortran-Flags

Here you can modify the list of Fortran options, which you can turn on or off see section 3.9.2.7 Fortran options.

See section How to change the list of flags.


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3.9.6.11 Warning-Flags

Here you can modify the list of Warning-Flags, which you can turn on or off see section 3.9.2.1 Warnings.

See section How to change the list of flags.


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3.9.6.12 Debugging-Flags

Here you can modify the list of Debugging-Flags, which you can turn on or off see section 3.9.2.3 Debugging.

See section How to change the list of flags.


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3.9.6.13 Optimization-Flags

Here you can modify the list of Optimization-Flags, which you can turn on or off see section 3.9.2.2 Optimizations.

see section How to change the list of flags.


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3.9.6.14 User words

Here you can define your own list of words, which can be specially highlighted, when syntax highlighting is enabled see section 3.9.6.3 Preferences.

How to change the list of flags  

How to change the list of flags

The syntax of the strings, which you can modify or add with the last menu-entries is any string followed by an optional modifier with the following meaning:

`%d'
if you activate this option, you must enter an integer there

`%d?'
if you activate this option, you can enter an integer there

`%c'
if you activate this option, you must enter a character there

`%c?'
if you activate this option, you can enter a character there

`%s'
if you activate this option, you must enter a string there

`%s?'
if you activate this option, you can enter a string there

`%s(STRING)'
if you activate this option, you must enter a string, which contains only characters defined by the string STRING, there

`%s?(STRING)'
if you activate this option, you can enter a string, which contains only characters defined by the string STRING, there

As an example: the string for the `-O' option is defined as `-O%d?' and the `-d' option see section 3.9.2.3 Debugging is defined as
`-d%s(MNDyrxjsLtfcSlgRJdkamp)'
which means, the string after `-d' must be a combination of the characters in
`MNDyrxjsLtfcSlgRJdkamp'

If you leave the dialogs for modifying the flag lists with the OK button or if you activate the Default button, all flags are disabled


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3.9.7 Save options

Here you can save all the options you currently customized to a file. RHIDE restricts this to saving them only to a file with the `.gpr' suffix (and `.gdt' for the desktop file).


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3.9.8 Load options

Here you can load the options from any existing project file.


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3.10 Windows

In this menu you get the functions for arranging, resizing and switching between the windows on the desktop:

3.10.1 Size/move  
3.10.2 Zoom  
3.10.3 Tile  
3.10.4 Cascade  
3.10.5 Next  
3.10.6 Previous  
3.10.7 Close  
3.10.8 List  
3.10.9 Project  
3.10.10 UserScreen  


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3.10.1 Size/move

With this function you can resize and/or move the current window. After selecting this, the frame of the current window will be drawn light-green and you can move it with the cursor-keys. To resize it, press Shift+ cursor-keys. To exit the moving/resizing function, press ESC or ENTER. Alternatively you can use the mouse. For moving, click on the top of the window and hold the left button down. Now you can move the window by moving the mouse. To resize it, click on lower right corner of the window, hold the button down and resize the window by moving the mouse. (This function has the hotkey Ctrl+F5 )


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3.10.2 Zoom

This brings up the window to maximal size or to previous size. (hotkey F5 or click with the mouse at the symbol on the right upper corner of the window)


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3.10.3 Tile

This arranges all the editor-windows on the desktop, to see them all simultaneously.


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3.10.4 Cascade

This arranges all the editor-windows on the desktop, to see the contents of the current editor-window and the top-frame of all the others.


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3.10.5 Next

Hotkey F6 switches to the next window on the desktop.


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3.10.6 Previous

Hotkey Shift+F6 switches to the previous window on the desktop.


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3.10.7 Close

This closes the current window. If it is an editor-window and its contents were modified, you will be prompted to save it. Hotkey Alt+F3 or click with the mouse on the upper-left symbol of the frame.


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3.10.8 List

Hotkey Alt+0 brings up a list of all windows that are currently on the desktop. You can select one of them and press ENTER to switch to it. With Del you can close the selected window.


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3.10.9 Project

With this function you can select the project window see section 4.4 Project window. If it was closed, it will be opened.


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3.10.10 UserScreen

Hotkey Alt+F5 shows the contents of the DOS-Screen. To leave this function, do any event. That means, press any key, or click with the mouse.


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3.11 Help

In this menu you have access to many predefined help entries in the big help system.

3.11.1 Help  
3.11.2 RHIDE Help index  
3.11.3 Syntax help submenu  
3.11.4 Index for syntax help  
3.11.5 libc reference  
3.11.6 Help about help  


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3.11.1 Help

This opens the INFO viewer. Many thanks at this point to Salvador Eduardo Tropea (SET). He wrote the very good INFO viewer for use with RHIDE. This was also the most important reason for me to write the documentation in Texinfo, because you have now an online help available with the produced INFO file `rhide.info'.

Pressing F1 invokes the help system from everywhere. For help on using the INFO viewer, press F1 within the help window. But the above things work only if you have correctly installed the INFO files that come with RHIDE.

If you have installed the binary archive of RHIDE as described in the `readme.bin', the INFO files are in `%DJDIR%/info'. If you have not modified your `djgpp.env' file, this directory is searched for the INFO files.

But you can put the INFO files in any directory you want, if you add this directory to the %INFOPATH% variable in your `djgpp.env' file in the section for `info'.


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3.11.2 RHIDE Help index

This brings up the help window with the main index for getting help for RHIDE.


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3.11.3 Syntax help submenu

In this submenu you can set the files to be searched for getting syntax help and you can also customize the options, how this is done.

3.11.3.1 Syntax help  
3.11.3.2 Files to search  
3.11.3.3 Options for searching  


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3.11.3.1 Syntax help

If you are in an editor window, and you press Ctrl+F1 , you get help about the function under or before the cursor. But only if this function is documented in the files you have given to be searched for see section 3.11.3.2 Files to search. If there was no help found you will be informed. This feature can be used also by clicking with the right mouse button on the word.


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3.11.3.2 Files to search

Give here a space separated list of files (if you give no suffix, the standard suffixes are tried) which should be scanned for getting help for a word.


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3.11.3.3 Options for searching

Here you can give some options, how the syntax help should work. The following search methods are selectable and other options. For all the search methods it is possible to get more than one matching topic. If that is true, you will find a list, from which you can select the wanted topic.

Exact  
Substring  
Fuzzy  
Search options  

Exact

When this is selected, you will get syntax help only, if in the selected files a topic with that exact name was found.

Substring

When this is selected, you will get syntax help, when the word is a substring of any of the nodes in the files to be searched for syntax help.

Fuzzy

This method uses a "Fuzzy search" for getting syntax help. That means it looks also for nodes, which are similar to the word for which you want to get syntax help.

Search options

These are several options for the textual search:
`Case sensitive'
When this is selected, the textual search is case sensitive.

Here you can set the bound for the fuzzy search. The range is from 1 to 1000 where 1 means that mostly every string matches any other string and 1000 means the exact match.


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3.11.4 Index for syntax help

Here you can get a list of all available topics for the syntax help, from where you can choose one (Enter, Space or double click).


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3.11.5 libc reference

This is a separate menu entry to open the libc reference, because this is used very often when writing C programs.


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3.11.6 Help about help

This brings up a help-window for instructions and available keystrokes when using the integrated INFO viewer. (see section `Top' in SETs Info Viewer)


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This document was generated by Robert Hoehne on February, 16 2003 using texi2html